Monday, 28 January 2013

Nowness



This picture is the prompt for the latest 100 Word Challenge over at Julia's Place. Now if I were one of those figures on that flimsy protruberance I would be worrying like heck that the architect had got his calculations right. And maybe that's why the picture made me think of death - or more particularly of an interview I heard yesterday with the guitarist Wilko Johnson who has been given ten months to live.  The man sounded positively jubilant as he recounted how the imminence of his end has liberated him from the preoccupations that blinker us all.

Eyes trained on the chasm of the future tend to be blind to the Now. A tracery of branches, the smile of a child are eclipsed by mortgage angst and to-do lists.  
But the dying man is clear-sighted. 'Every cold breeze against your cheek, every brick in the road makes you feel alive,' he says. 'There is this marvellous feeling of freedom. Why didn't I work out before that it's just the moment you're in that matters!' 
And we, oppressed by wider horizons, should maybe tread more savouringly and not wait for death to teach us how to live.  





20 comments:

  1. Fantastic! And so right. I really loved this. You have clearly understood humanity so well. I particularly love the opening sentence. Inspirational writing.

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  2. The prompt photo has me shrinking back into my comfortable sofa in fear!The lovely sentiments of your writing pulls me back in

    xx Jazzy

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    1. Well, I'm mighty glad to hear it. Thanks for saying so.

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  3. This reminds me of that inimitable philosopher Joyce Grenfell: There is no such thing as time/Only this very minute/And I'm in it/Thank the Lord

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  4. Beautiful. The face of death always teaches one how to live properly. It's a gift - that's why, at the moment, I keep telling myself that I am going to die - not to be morbid - but to wake myself up. A very timely piece. X.

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  5. There's alot of truth in this. Very good.

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  6. It is beautiful, but therein lies the irony of life and death. If we live for the now, and last longer than we expect, life could get very tough indeed in our later years. However, there is no reason why we can't simply savour the moments a bit more than we do, eyes on the future...

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    1. I dread extreme longevity, and might jettison nowness if I'm burdened with crippling years. But right now I'm trying to savour the moment - it's just that my tax return keeps getting in the way.

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  7. Are you actually in my head? I SO needed to read this today. Thank you.

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  8. Wonderful writing! Helped put a few things in perspective for me!

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  9. Incredible post. You certainly have a gift when it comes to placing the reader into the scene. I felt that breeze on my cheek.

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    1. Goodness, thanks! You're certainly my new favourite anonymous person!

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  10. A very nice piece. So glad you stepped a little beyond the boundaries of the picture itself.

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